Thomas Downing: History of a Chesapeake Oysterman

With crystal chandeliers glistening overhead and plush carpets laid out under their feet, the city’s elite felt quite at home in the upscale oyster bar located in downtown New York City. Every night the place was packed with A-list dignitaries, industrialists, merchants, bankers, politicians and society women, sipping champagne and nibbling on the region’s finest Read More

New England Whaling

When Herman Melville wrote Moby Dick in 1851, he was at the height of his success as a writer with a knack for mixing his years at sea with building fictional characters based on his shipmates. At the same time, New England Whaling and the American whaling fleet from New England was also reaching its Read More

The Importance of Lake Champlain

The freshwater Lake Champlain stretches 125 miles from Whitehall, NY, to the Richelieu River in the Canadian province of Quebec, and it only measures 14 miles across at its widest point. The Lake Champlain Valley provides a natural divide between the Green Mountains of Vermont and Adirondack Mountains of New York. Today, Lake Champlain is Read More

Cruising Through History – Monterey, CA

LITTLE OCEAN TREASURERS LOCKED IN A TIN How Monterey Became the Sardine Capital of the World “Cannery Row is the gathered and scattered, tin and iron and rust and splintered wood, chipped pavement and weedy lots and junk heaps, sardine canneries of corrugated iron, honky tonks, restaurants and whore houses, and little-crowded groceries, and laboratories Read More

Fabulous Forts of the Coastal Southeast

The ports and river inlets of the Eastern Seaboard offer a unique glimpse into the history of exploration, colonialism, independence and the Civil War. Ships planted the American colonies here, and trade by sea propelled the United States into the powerhouse economy of the world by the turn of the 20th century. However, maintaining a Read More

California’s Channel Islands

The Channel Islands are set apart from the mainland of southern California by the Santa Barbara Channel. Five islands make up the Channel Islands National Park: San Miguel, Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz, Anacapa and Santa Barbara. Each island offers a unique boating experience that includes hiking, diving, kayaking, bird and whale watching, and fishing. When Read More

Mallows Bay

On a sunny afternoon in May 1915, a German submarine off the coast of Kinsale, Ireland, unleashed a torpedo that exploded on the starboard side of the RMS Lusitania. In 18 minutes, the luxury ocean liner sank to the bottom of the sea, taking 1,198 passengers and crew, including 128 Americans, to a cold, watery Read More

Martha’s Vineyard vs. Nantucket

Two seaside towns that embody New England’s quintessential beauty and charm go toe to toe. Who wins in the Martha’s Vineyard vs Nantucket showdown? Beaches Martha’s Vineyard Carved by glaciers millions of years ago, the epic Aquinnah Cliffs line the half-mile stretch of pristine coastline that makes up Moshup Beach – a prime destination for sunning Read More

How New York City Landed on the Map

The story of Henry Hudson exploring the Hudson River begins in the first decade of the 17th century, the Dutch and English vied to be the dominant world powers. Both countries used their seafaring tradition for trade and colonization, which during that era was the key to national prosperity. However, both of those nations were Read More

The Changing Shape of Michigan Maps

ALTHOUGH the Great Lakes of Ontario, Erie, Huron, Michigan and Superior all played a vital role in the lives and histories of the Native American people living along its shores, it’s only been in the last five hundred years that printed maps of the Great Lakes have existed. The first printed maps and charts were Read More